In Process – Jason Rose

Luke - Headshot

Luke by Jason Rose – Year 3

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Portrait Strategies

As part of the practical workshop programme this semester, first year BA (Hons) Photography students have been exploring the studio, developing their technical and interpersonal skills, whilst also considering the nature of the photographic studio as a creative space.

Last week, students were set a simple brief to design a style and strategy to apply to a series of portraits. They experimented with ways of provoking a reaction/response from their subjects, either disarming their sitters or putting them under duress. Working in small groups they analysed the relationship between photographer and subject, questioning the notion of either party holding power when the shutter’s pressed…

This week the groups created their series of works, under live conditions and to tight time limits, they took control of the studio space and acted out their strategies:

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© Ian Sharpe, Joe Williamson, Natashca Istratoglou, Roxy Moss, Thomas Rees

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© Ali Hibberd, Damian Klemczak, Emma Givens, Abi Moss-Coomes

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© Jason Rose, Ashleigh Swan, Eli Stewart, Charlie Stanton, Andrew Rawlinson

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© Iain Hamilton, Beth Furbey, Petra Viltova, Rebecca Keogh

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© Kendall Willmore, Holly Flethcher, Claire Rogan, Beth Holiday, Anna Hodgson, Bethanie Lawson

Open Submission – Xu by Karl Child

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Karl Child a current second year student progressing into third year presents ‘xu’ a project exploring the lives of a Chinese family living in Preston. Karl explains the project:

“For my second year final assignment for the ‘Photography and the City’ module, and also as part of an on-going project for UCLan’s Confucius Institute, I have recently been working with a Chinese family who live in Preston, documenting their lives at home. The images are part of a larger project that looks at Chinese Heritage in the North West. The images were taken using a Walker Titan 5×4 camera, processed by Peak Imaging, and then I scanned them using the scanning facilities in the Media Factory. I used the Walker Titan camera as I was forced to slow down and think more about what I wanted to communicate and how I was going to compose my images. The whole process takes much more time and consideration than shooting on a digital camera and I believe this way of working improves both quality and concept.”

Open submission – Waste Collectors by Corina Pickering

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Recently graduated Corina compares the role of waste workers in different cultural settings in the Uk and China through a series of Portraits exploring issues of gender in the visible workforce. Corina explains:

“In China it appears that waste collectors are in abundance, largely due to the need to create jobs for its vast population. Despite their widespread presence they, like the waste collectors in the UK, are a typically invisible group of citizens within their respective society. However, if these workers in this trade vanished, the general public would almost certainly become very aware of them. In contrast to the British waste collectors earnings, the Chinese workers wages are a small fraction of what the British workers are paid. Gender is an issue that is raised when comparing the two countries; in China there are just as many female waste collectors as male. This is strongly contrasted with the UK where female workers in this industry are greatly outnumbered. There are many questions raised by the project and thy leave me wanting to further explore this matter.”

Corina Pickering is a portrait photographer based in the North West. Her work explores gender and society.

To see more of her work and further images from this project, visit www.corinapickering.com

Berlin Stories: Karl Child

With a passion for photography and street art, visiting what is known as the Street Art Capital of Europe with my course was an opportunity I couldn’t miss. The initial preparation and research we carried out before visiting Berlin played a vital part for me as I had never been before and didn’t fully know what to expect. Throughout the research it was still a struggle to really grasp an understanding for the culture, and nail down what it was I wanted to document whist we were there but from the moment we arrived it was clear to me that I had to document everything!

In the same way that graffiti artists have used every part of Berlin from the bins to the bridges to make their mark, I wanted to capture every part of the city to produce a body of work that could be viewed by people like myself, who had never visited Berlin and I wanted them to be able to understand and almost feel as though they were there themselves.

Below is a selection of photographs that I’ve chosen to represent Berlin from my point of view. They capture the architecture and construction of the ever-growing city, and document how the space is used and occupied by the people of Berlin through a series of landscape and portrait images.

There are more images and a separate project at www.karlchild.com which looks at a single street corner and the people that pass by over a short period of time, taken from an observational vantage point.

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